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Visiting the Cliffs of Moher, County Clare, Ireland

By - December 14, 2011 (Updated: February 3, 2018)

This entry is part 5 of 6 in the series Exploring Ireland.
THIS POST MAY CONTAIN COMPENSATED LINKS. FIND MORE INFO IN MY DISCLAIMER.
The Cliffs of Moher, County Clare, Ireland

The Cliffs of Moher, County Clare, Ireland

As a photographer, I am always looking for destinations rich in natural beauty.  While I love architecture and other man-made tourist sites, there is something particularly special about naturally occurring landmarks. One such place is the Cliffs of Moher, on Ireland’s west coast.

I’ve visited the Cliffs of Moher, in county Clare, twice now, and I would visit again in a heartbeat. The cliffs are located near the village of Doolin (worth a visit in itself), at the edge of the barren expanse of rock known as The Burren.

Spanning 8km, the Cliffs of Moher tower 214 meters (702 ft), at their highest point, over the Atlantic Ocean.  They are a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site as well as one of Ireland’s largest bird refuges.

The Cliffs of Mohre, County Clare, Ireland

The Cliffs of Moher, County Clare, Ireland

Visits to the Cliffs of Moher begin at the visitors’ centre, an eco-friendly structure built into the hillside. Resembling a Hobbit house, the centre opened in 2007 and is home to an interpretive centre, cafeteria and shop. Small independently run craft shops also line the visitors’ centre.

The Cliffs of Mohre Visitor's Centre

The Cliffs of Moher’s Hobbit House-like Visitor’s Centre

The cliffs themselves are accessed by a network of paved paths and stairways, lined with walls to keep the public from falling to their demise, as well as destroying the cliffs and nesting bird habitat. Of course, these walls and warning are frequently ignored.

A future candidate for the Darwin Awards?

A future candidate for the Darwin Awards?

Marking the highest point of the cliffs is O’Brien’s Tower. This small, round, stone tower was built by Sir Cornellius O’Brien, as a lookout for the visiting Victorian tourists, who were already flocking to the cliffs, in 1835.

O'Brien's Tower

O’Brien’s Tower overlooks the rugged Atlantic Coast

From this high point, on a clear day, it is possible to view the Aran Islands and the hills of Connemara.

From Doolin the shore at Doolin, you can see the cliffs, if it’s clear. You can also join one of several boat tours to the base of the cliffs.

The Cliffs of Mohre, County Clare, Ireland

The Cliffs of Moher, as seen from the Doolin coast

Don’t just take our word for it. See the beauty of the Cliffs of Moher for yourself.

The Cliffs of Mohre, County Clare, Ireland

The Cliffs of Moher, County Clare, Ireland

Visit ACM Photography for more photos of the Cliffs of Moher and County Clare, Ireland.

The Cliffs of Moher
County Clare, Ireland
Tel   +353 (0)65 7086141
Click for Opening Hours

Admission per person 2011

  • Adult: €6.00
  • Children under 16: Free
  • Senior Citizen: €4.00
  • Student: €4.00
  • Disabled Visitor: €4.00

There is a 10% discount available if tickets are booked on-line

O’Brien’s Tower Ticket Prices 2011

  • Adult €2.00
  • Child €1.00

Visiting The Cliffs of Moher from Belgium

Aer Lingus flies from Brussels to Dublin non-stop
Ryanair flies from Charleroi to Dublin non-stop

Car rentals are available at Dublin airport from most international companies. While driving ourselves, was our preferred option for reaching the cliffs there are public transportation alternatives:

  • Irish Rail has daily train services from Dublin to Limerick, Ennis and Galway. You can then take a bus to the Cliffs of Moher.
  • Bus Eireann operates daily scheduled bus services to the Cliffs of Moher.
  • There are many tour operators who include the cliffs on their itineraries. The Cliffs of Moher website has a good list of transport providers.
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Alison Cornford-Matheson
Alison Cornford-Matheson is a Canadian freelance writer and travel photographer and the founder of Cheeseweb.eu. She is the author of The Foodie Guide to Brussels: Local Tips for Restaurants, Shops, Hotels, and Activities. Alison landed in Belgium in 2005 and, over the years, has become passionate about slow and sustainable travel, in Europe and beyond. She loves to discover hidden gems - be they museums, shops, restaurants, castles, gardens or landscapes, and share them through her words and photos. She has visited 45 countries and is currently slow travelling through North America in an RV, with her husband, Andrew, and two well-travelled cats. You can also follow her work on Google+
Alison Cornford-Matheson
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