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Sardinia – Nuraghe Palmavera and Stintino

By alison - April 12, 2010 (Updated: November 24, 2014)

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Sardinia, Italy.
Nuraghe Palmavera

Nuraghe Palmavera

Day two in Sardinia was my favourite of the five. We learned a bit of history, saw some fantastic beaches, made beautiful flower find and even did a tad of rock climbing.

We were up and on the road early to visit the Nuraghe Palmavera. Sardinia is dotted with over 8000 nuraghe but despite their prevalence on the countryside, little is known about these megalithic structures.

Nuraghe Palmavera is one of the most important nuraghic sites on Sardinia and is believed to date from the 14th century BC. In the middle of the site is a large cone-shaped fort with several different rooms. Surrounding the main structure are the remains of more than 50 small circular huts.

Inside the Nuraghe Palmavera

Inside the Nuraghe Palmavera

As with many historical sites in Europe, I am always fascinated when you are permitted to climb over and explore the ruins inside. In Canada you would be lucky if you were allowed to touch the exterior walls, let alone wander through the remains.

We had the site more or less to ourselves and in addition to exploring the ruins, we enjoyed a bit of flower and lizard photography, as well.

Our next stop was the city of Stintino, where we found more flowers to photograph. On our way into the town, we stopped to photograph the view and were thrilled to discover a hillside of wild-flowers including some tiny orchids. The passing traffic must have wondered about the two crazy women crawling along the hillside with their butts in the air, but we both managed to get some great photos.

Once in the town, we had pizza by the sea and enjoyed the sunshine.

Stintino, Sardinia

Stintino, Sardinia
Photography can get Dirty

Photography can get Dirty
Wild Orchid in Sardinia

Wild Orchid in Sardinia
Lunch in Stintino

Lunch in Stintino

After lunch we continued north to Capo del Falcone and the most beautiful beach I have seen since I was in the Bahamas several years ago. The sand was soft and white and the water was crystal clear and that amazing Mediterranean turquoise. It wasn’t yet warm enough to swim but we waded about in the shallows taking pictures.

From the beach you can see a tiny island with a tower, Torre de La Pelosa and beyond that the larger island of Asinara which is a nature reserve.

I’ve done a lot of (stupid) things in the name of photography so I wasn’t above climbing to the top of a cliff (in less than appropriate footwear) for a view of the beach and Asinara Island. We made it to the top and it was worth the effort, although scrambling back down was a bit dicey.

It wasn’t all hard work though. We did take some time to sit on the beach and enjoy the sun before heading south again.

Asinara Island

Asinara Island
Enjoying the Beach

Enjoying the Beach
Worth the Climb to view Asinara Island and Torre de La Pelosa

Worth the Climb to view Asinara Island and Torre de La Pelosa

Our last stop of the evening was the cliffs of Capo Caccia which we had seen from the boat the day before. Being on top of the cliffs gives an amazing perspective of the surrounding area. We were surprised again by the amount of plant life we discovered growing straight out of the rocky cliffs – from lilies to tiny irises.

Sunset at Capo Caccia

Sunset at Capo Caccia

After a full day of fresh air and photography, we headed back to our B&B for supper and rest for another Sardinian adventure.

To be continued…

Read about Day One of our Sardinian Adventure

Read more from Cheeseweb.eu

Alison

Alison

Big Cheese at CheeseWeb
Alison Cornford-Matheson is a Canadian freelance writer and travel photographer and the founder of Cheeseweb.eu. She is the author of The Foodie Guide to Brussels: Local Tips for Restaurants, Shops, Hotels, and Activities. Alison landed in Belgium in 2005 and, over the years, has become passionate about slow and sustainable travel, in Europe and beyond. She loves to discover hidden gems - be they museums, shops, restaurants, castles, gardens or landscapes, and share them through her words and photos. She has visited 45 countries and is currently slow travelling through North America in an RV, with her husband, Andrew, and two well-travelled cats. You can also follow her work on Google+
Alison
Cheese + Goats = My personal heaven. We discover an oasis in the cheese desert. https://t.co/Os8U86UEiX - 3 hours ago

13 comments

  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention Sardinia - Nuraghe Palmavera and Stintino | CheeseWeb -- Topsy.com

    • Comment by Alison

      Alison

      Alison April 12, 2010 at 17:49

      Thanks so much!

  2. Comment by Unexpected Traveller

    Unexpected Traveller April 12, 2010 at 18:14

    I love the fact that you can get up close and personal with some of the neolithic temples and structures .. but on the other hand, I also am wary because I know that this could affect them and wear them away.

    Love the photos …

    • Comment by Alison

      Alison

      Alison April 13, 2010 at 11:24

      This is absolutely true and I always feel bad when I see people disrespecting the historic sites. I do think it makes history so much more personal when you can touch and experience it first-hand so I guess ideally I’d like a happy medium. I haven’t yet visited Stonehenge but I’ve heard that you can only view it from a distance now and I find that a bit sad. I know we need to preserve these monuments but it would be nice to find a compromise.

  3. Comment by Lee

    Lee April 12, 2010 at 23:00

    Beautiful pictures! I love the feet in the water one – such beautiful patterns with the water and the sand.

    • Comment by Alison

      Alison

      Alison April 13, 2010 at 11:26

      Thanks so much Lee! It was an inspiring place! I’ll be posting many more photos on my photography website in a few weeks so feel free to check it out and subscribe for updates.

  4. Comment by expatraveler

    expatraveler April 13, 2010 at 03:14

    Wow – these photos are absolutely incredible!!! Really this makes me want to get there and go for a photo hunt!

    • Comment by Alison

      Alison

      Alison April 13, 2010 at 11:26

      Thanks so much Jen! I’d love to go back and explore and photograph more. If you like nature (and I know you do) it’s definitely a great place to visit!

  5. Comment by Angela

    Angela April 13, 2010 at 19:12

    It looks like you had a great time in Sardinia! The nuragic civilisation is something I find very fascinating, I’m carrying out in-depth research on the topic, trying to move away from the static academic dogmas… So far it seems to me that during the nuragic times Sardinia was more developed than it is now!

    • Comment by Alison

      Alison

      Alison April 14, 2010 at 09:12

      We had a fantastic time! Thank you so much for all of your planning help! I’d love to go back and see different areas of the island and my husband is already saying how much he would love to go 🙂

      It must be fascinating to study that civilization. They seemed so advanced and yet so little is known about them now. Really interesting stuff!

      • Comment by Angela

        Angela April 14, 2010 at 21:06

        Yes, it adds to the mystery the fact that little is known about the nuragic civilisation and also that it disappeared quite suddenly. Some research argues that Sardinia can be the lost civilisation of Atlantis mentioned in Plato’s literature. Needless to say, I’m into it too, so wait for my next breakthrough 😉

  6. Pingback: Sardinia - Bosa and Pottu Codinu | CheeseWeb

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